Mr. Z's Daily Internet Homework                                

Do You have your Z-Notes?   A Z-Note is an outline of the notes that you should be taking in class.   To help improve your note taking skills print out the Z-Notes, and fill them out while we review the AIM in class! 
   
The Earth and the Solar System      Z-Notes   

Mr. Z's Science Notes

 

Part One:  The Earth and Maps

What are the parts of the Earth  Lesson Review

  1. What is the atmosphere?
  2. What is the lithosphere?
  3. What is the hydrosphere?
  4. What is the core?
  5. What is the mantle?
  6. What is the crust?

What is latitude and Longitude Lesson Review

  1. The equator divides the earth into the ____ _____ and the ____ ______.
  2. The prime meridian divided the earth into the _____ _____ and the ____ _____.
  3. Lines of latitude are ______ and ______ intersect.
  4. Lines of longitude are ______ and ______ intersect.
  5. The equator is ___ degrees, both poles are ____ degrees.
  6. In giving coordinates, the ________ usually is written first.

How to read a Map Lesson Review

  1. Before you read a map, you must first read the ______ .
  2. One of the most important items in the key is the ______.

How to read a topographic map  Lesson Review

  1. ______ maps show elevation.
  2. Before using this map, you need to determine the _____ intervals.
  3. You determine these intervals by analyzing the _____ lines.
  4. On one of these maps, the steepest hills have _____ lines that are ______ .
  5. Flatter areas are usually marked with contour lines that are _________ .

 

Part Two: The Solar System and the Moon              

Parts of the Solar System Lesson Review

  1. What is Heliocentric
  2. What keeps the planets from moving out to space.
  3. What keeps the moon from moving out to space.
  4. What are the two types of satellites.

Glencoe: 7:1:             How is the Earth described? 

  1. The Earth has a _____ _____ that protects us from harmful _______ .
  2. The magnetic field is probably caused by movement deep within the ____.
  3. The magnetic field of the Earth is similar to that of a bar _____ .
  4. Do the magnetic poles always remain constant? Explain.
  5. Where does the Aurora come from?
  6. The Earth’s orbit is an _______ .
  7. What two reasons cause Earth to be different than Venus.

Revolution and Rotation Lesson Review

  1. How long is the Earth's revolution?
  2. How long is the Earth's Rotation?
  3. The further a planet is from the sun the _____ its revolution.
  4. Which way does the Earth rotate on its axis?
  5. In which season does the SUN appear higher in the sky?
  6. What causes day and night?

Seasons and the Moon Lesson Review

  1. What causes the seasons of the Earth.
  2. Diagram the tilt of the Earth and the Sun during summer in the US.
  3. Diagram the tilt of the Earth and the Sun during winter in the US.
  4. Diagram a solar eclipse.
  5. Diagram a lunar eclipse.
  6. Diagram the positions of the Sun, Earth, and Moon during a Full Moon, No Moon, 1/2 Moon.
  7. On the above diagrams, place an X where the 4 quarter moons would be in the sky.

Glencoe: 7:2              How is time measured? 

  1. One complete rotational turn of the Earth takes _____  ____ .
  2. How wide is each time zone?
  3. Where is the International Date Line?  Why do we have one?
  4. Contrast an equinox with a solstice.
  5. The Earth is tilted on is axis by ____ degrees. This helps cause the ____ .

Glencoe: 7:3               How does the Moon effect the Earth?

  1. The Moon to revolve around the Earth takes ____ days.
  2. But, because the Earth is rotating, the lunar phases take  ____ days.
  3. Why do we always see the same side of the moon?
  4. Why is the effect of the Moon on the tides of Earth, greater then the Sun's gravity?
  5. What is the difference between waxing and waning?
  6. What is the Giant Impact Theory?

Chapter Review  Page 212:  except #14, 16, 28, 29

Earth Sun Flash File     

Tidal Cycles

 

Unit Review:  Astronomy   Download

ASTRONOMY

Standards:

Key Idea 1: The Earth and celestial phenomena can be described by principles of relative motion and perspective.

The universe is comprised of a wide array of objects, a few of which can be seen by the unaided eye. Others can only be observed with scientific instruments. These celestial objects, distinct from Earth, are in motion relative to Earth and each other. Measurements of these motions vary with the perspective of the observer. Cyclical changes on Earth are caused by interactions among objects in the universe.

 Performance Indicator 1.1:  Explain daily, monthly, and seasonal changes on Earth.

 Major Understandings:

1.1a Earth’s Sun is an average-sized star. The Sun is more than a million times greater

in volume than Earth.

1.1b Other stars are like the Sun but are so far away that they look like points of light.

Distances between stars are vast compared to distances within our solar system.

1.1c The Sun and the planets that revolve around it are the major bodies in the solar sys-

tem. Other members include comets, moons, and asteroids. Earth’s orbit is nearly circular.

1.1d Gravity is the force that keeps planets in orbit around the Sun and the Moon in

orbit around the Earth.

1.1e Most objects in the solar system have a regular and predictable motion. These

motions explain such phenomena as a day, a year, phases of the Moon, eclipses, tides,

meteor showers, and comets.

1.1f The latitude/longitude coordinate system and our system of time are based on

celestial observations.

1.1g Moons are seen by reflected light. Our Moon orbits Earth, while Earth orbits the

Sun. The Moon’s phases as observed from Earth are the result of seeing different por-

tions of the lighted area of the Moon’s surface. The phases repeat in a cyclic pattern in

about one month.

1.1h The apparent motions of the Sun, Moon, planets, and stars across the sky can be

explained by Earth’s rotation and revolution. Earth’s rotation causes the length of one

day to be approximately 24 hours. This rotation also causes the Sun and Moon to appear

to rise along the eastern horizon and to set along the western horizon. Earth’s revolution

around the Sun defines the length of the year as 365 1/4 days.

1.1i The tilt of Earth’s axis of rotation and the revolution of Earth around the Sun cause

seasons on Earth. The length of daylight varies depending on latitude and season.

1.1j The shape of Earth, the other planets, and stars is nearly spherical.

 

Vocabulary: 

Par #

 

 

Term

1.0

lh

The earth rotates in 24 hours

day

1.0

lj

Third rock from the sun

Earth

1.0

 l g

Can be either full, new, or in between

Moon's phases

1.0

lh

Equals one revolution of the Earth

year

1.1

 h

The Sun rises in the East and sets …

apparent motion

1.1

c

Very large celestial material in our solar system

asteroids

1.1

i

For the Earth its 23 degrees

axis of rotation

1.1

f

Using a telescope, radio telescope, Hubble

celestial observations

1.1

d

The force of attraction to the center of an object

gravity

1.1

 h

Where the sky “hits” the sea (or land)

horizon

1.1

c

What celestial bodies MAY do around another

orbit

1.1

c

The smallest of which is a molecule

particles

1.1

 a

Determine by the cyclical pattern of it orbit

phases of the moon

1.1

c

Large celestial body that orbits a Star

planet

1.1

a

The amount of space

Volume

1.1

c

An object with an elongated orbit around a star

comets

1.1

g

The Earth’s and/or the Moons rotation and revolution

cyclic pattern

1.1

f

A co-ordinate system

latitude/longitude

1.1

 e

When celestial particles hit the Earth’s outer atmosphere

meteor shower

1.1

c

A natural satellite

moon

1.1

 g

The cause of the tides on Earth

Moon

1.1

h

Movement twirling upon its axis

rotation

1.1

i

Caused the tilt of the axis

seasons

1.1

 j

The near-shape of a planets

spherical

1.1

b

Our is called Sun, but there are billions

star

1.1

 e

Happens because of the pull of the moon’s gravity

tide

1.1

h

The complete cycle of a planet  around its sun

revolution

1.1

a

The name of the star in our little solar system

Sun